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Dec 19

Whisenhunt becomes All-Time Wins Leader

Congats to Coach and GO Cards!!!

Whisenhunt becomes All-Time Wins Leader.

Dec 17

Returning To .500

Returning To .500

After disastrous start, Cards can break even by beating Browns

The Cardinals want to keep pressing — like linebacker O’Brien Schofield‘s attempt to block a punt last weekend — as they seek to return to a .500 record.

The losses, piling up so frequently earlier this season, are gone but not forgotten.

“Losing six in a row,” said cornerback Patrick Peterson, “is miserable.”

But it’s also the reason Sunday, when the Cardinals host the Cleveland Browns at University of Phoenix Stadium, could be so special.

That six-game losing streak left the Cards with a 1-6 record. If the Cards beat the reeling Browns (4-9), however, coach Ken Whisenhunt’s bunch will have rallied to 7-7 with two games remaining in the season, a remarkable turnaround for a year that started so sour.

“I think it would mean a lot to our fans, I think it would mean a lot to our players,” Whisenhunt said. “It’s a big deal for us, to be where we were. That’s nice and it means a lot.  But we have done a good job in this stretch focused on a week-to-week thing and not getting too caught up in that. Hopefully that continues Sunday.”

The postseason – even if the Cardinals finish off their remarkable turnaround and win out to go 9-7 — is more of a dream than anything. Peterson was asked about the postseason, and after he started to answer, he caught himself, perhaps a nod to the focus Whisenhunt is emphasizing to his team.

“We want to continue to control what we can, which is winning our ballgames,” Peterson said. “So much has to happen.”

It still has energized the locker room beyond just a better record, however. “We have something to look forward to,” defensive tackle Darnell Dockett said. “Slim chance in hell, but you never know what will happen. It motivates you – we ain’t out of it yet.”

The Browns can’t say the same. After starting 2-1 and 3-3 under new coach Pat Shurmur, Cleveland’s season has dissolved into a string of losses and controversy, including the hamstring and contract problems of running back Peyton Hillis and now the handling of the concussion of starting quarterback Colt McCoy.

“Right, wrong or indifferent, we’re dealing with trying to change some of the ways you do business day to day,” Shurmur said. “It takes a little bit of time. I’m as impatient as the people that are critical of me. I want it to happen yesterday, but unfortunately it doesn’t. We’re just grinding through it.”

McCoy won’t play Sunday because of the concussion. The Cards will see backup Seneca Wallace, and coincidentally, will likely start their own backup QB,John Skelton, because starter Kevin Kolb also suffered a concussion last week.

Skelton, however, is coming of the best game of his career. He did have three turnovers last week – an issue Whisenhunt remains concerned about – but completed 19-of-28 passes, much higher than normal and what the Cards hope is a nod toward his development.

Whomever is quarterback has a suddenly stout defense upon which to lean as well – and the emerging Cards’ defense is going against a Cleveland offense that, even when fully healthy, doesn’t exactly feel threatening.

The path to .500 has never seemed as wide open this season as it does now.

“We dug ourselves a really big hole going 1-and-6 like that,” wide receiverLarry Fitzgerald said. “It leaves a bad taste in your mouth. The way we have played the last six weeks is encouraging and lets us all know we are capable of better things. We have to keep pushing.”Returning To .500.

Oct 02

Cards vs Giants here we come!

University of Phoenix stadium should be rockin for this one.  Go Cards!!!

Sep 28

Will Google own the sun? No, just some of the solar panels

Image: Solar-powered home

American Vision Solar

This home in Simi Valley, Calif., uses a solar power system owned by Google, operated by Clean Power Finance and installed by American Vision Solar.

By Miguel LlanosReporter

msnbc.com

Coming soon to a home near you: Solar panels owned by Google. That’s right, the software giant announced Tuesday that it’s investing $75 million to get more homeowners hooked up to the sun for their electricity.

Over the years, Google has invested $850 million in renewable energy, including $280 million in a solar financing project last June, but this is the first time it will actually own the hardware — from the photovoltaic cells on rooftops to the power inverters in basements and garages.

“They own 100 percent of the asset,” says Nat Kreamer, chief executive officer of Clean Power Finance, a company based in San Francisco and Google’s partner in the new venture.

But don’t expect Google logos on rooftops across America. “There’s no Google branding on the panels,” says Whitney Phaneuf, a spokesperson for Clean Power Finance. “Google doesn’t want to be a utility.”

What Google will do is provide the financing so 3,000 homes can get hooked up, at no out-of pocket cost, to a system that typically runs between $30,000 and $40,000. Local installers will do the work, and then homeowners will pay a fixed, monthly rate for their electricity. All maintenance is covered by the rate.

“We’re really helping homeowners refinance their electricity bills,” says Phaneuf.

Since the contracts are typically for 20 years, Google gets a steady flow of revenue via Clean Power Finance, as well as the benefit of federal and state renewable energy subsidies.

“Cash sales (of solar panels) have been good, but once you add financing, sales can go through the roof,” said Rick Needham, Google’s director of green business operations. “It’s an opportunity to significantly expand the market.”

“We think it makes a lot of sense to use solar photovoltaic (PV) technology — rooftop solar panels — to generate electricity right where you need it at home,” Needham added in a blogpost Tuesday. “It greens our energy mix by using existing roof space while avoiding transmission constraints, and it can be cheaper than drawing electricity from the traditional grid.”

Google didn’t disclose what kind of return on investment it expects, but Clean Power Finance says others who have provided similar financing have made money.

“Absolutely, it’s an investment targeted at making money,” says Kreamer

.Will Google own the sun? No, just some of the solar panels.

Sep 23

Trying Not To Bottom Out

Trying Not To Bottom Out

Cards, unlike NFC West brethren, have avoided rebuild

Defensive end Calais Campbell sacks Seattle quarterback Matt Hasselbeck last season.

The problems could have been long-term, from the day Kurt Warner decided he didn’t want to play football anymore.

Certainly, the Cards could have dipped, especially when Matt Leinart didn’t work out. The Cardinals didn’t have a good season last year, but the whole plan of an “aggressive” offseason was predicated on the idea they couldn’t go through it again.

Every team in the NFC West is in separate stages of a transition. The 49ers have a new coach but, for some reason, kept the same quarterback, probably keeping them treading water outside the postseason for at least another year. The Rams went through three seasons with a total of only six victories, an ugly path that finally earned them quarterback Sam Bradford. The Seahawks finally moved on from quarterback Matt Hasselbeck this year, and the early returns are that Seattle could end up among the worst teams in the league.

Given the opportunities within the division, the last thing the Cardinals want to do is bottom out.

“When they say a team is going through transition, I feel like people try to use it as an excuse to have a bad season,” tackle Levi Brown said. “We’ve got the guys who we got, and you go and play.”

The Cardinals’ visit to Seattle Sunday is a contrast in organizations. The Seahawks managed to win the NFC West last season despite a 7-9 record, and after winning a playoff game there seemed to be some momentum. The Cards seemed to be in limbo after a five-win season.

After the lockout, however, the Seahawks moved on from Hasselbeck and went with Tarvaris Jackson, as opposed to the Cards making the big play forKevin Kolb. Jackson’s acquisition – along with a massive amount of other changes – seemed to signal rebuilding.

“Our intentions were to go right back after it,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “Last year no one thought we had a chance to be involved in the division and we found a way. Every move we made was to get good right now. We didn’t try something for the future. That was not a thought.”

The bump that was 2010 wasn’t a thought for the Cardinals either. The Cards look much different than the team coach Ken Whisenhunt first took over in 2007 and even from the team that reached the Super Bowl a season later.

The last thing any coach wants to talk about is rebuilding. The roster infusion in the short offseason – including the trade of Kolb – was about immediate respectability.

“I don’t think about that, rebuilding,” Whisenhunt said. “When you lose good football players, it is never easy to replace them, whether it is through free agency or retiring. That’s why you have to bring your young players along and at some point, they have to play for you.”

Winning within that prism isn’t always simple, but starting over usually means massive change anyway. In some ways, winning is about job preservation for the guys already in place. It also helps you keep the good players you already have.

“We hope it’s the last time we have to deal with that,” wide receiverLarry Fitzgerald said about last season, and the idea of staying competitive.

That should serve the Cardinals well, even as they work through some of their own issues. The Rams are past their lowest point, but haven’t proven they have fully recovered. The Seahawks and 49ers seem to have a longer road ahead.

Not that the Cards are concerned about that.

“Don’t nobody care about the times you are struggling,” defensive tackleDarnell Dockett said. “They don’t care about that. It’s all about what you do on Sundays. We can make a million excuses about why every team is not winning, but at the end of the day, it is wins and losses.

“When we went through our drought last year, no one gave a damn. Seattle or the Rams might have a drought, but we don’t care, we have our own issues.”

via Trying Not To Bottom Out.

Sep 14

Washington Breaks Out

Washington Breaks Out


Linebacker Daryl Washington comes down with one of his two interceptions Sunday, although this one was negated because of a penalty.

When the Cardinals drafted linebacker Daryl Washington a year ago, they considered taking him in the first round before settling on nose tackle Dan Williams.

They made sure to get him in the second round, however, thinking he had star potential. There were flashes of that as a rookie, but in Sunday’s season opener, it was on display constantly. Washington finished with six tackles, a sack (credited with a half-a-takedown twice), a quarterback pressure, a pass deflection and an interception. He also had a second interception negated because of a penalty.

“It’s the first game,” Washington said. “I was looking forward to having a big game. Obviously us winning, playing at home, you’ve got to be happy with that. But I wanted to make a statement.”

via Washington Breaks Out.

Sep 10

Starting Anew

Starting Anew

Cards open against Panthers ready to forget last season

Coach Ken Whisenhunt and the Cardinals are anxious to start the 2011 season Sunday after struggling most of the 2010 season.

The Cardinals underwent significant change in the offseason, with more than a third of the 53-man roster new to the team in 2011.

That still leaves plenty of players behind that were around in 2010, a miserable season that no one wants to repeat when the new season begins Sunday in the opener against Carolina.

“We know what 5-and-11 felt like,” defensive tackle Darnell Dockett said. “Look at the game film last year and look at how much we didn’t play together, how many mistakes we made. That sucks. To have an opportunity to redeem yourself, a lot of games will be personal.”

The game against the Panthers features plenty of storylines, from the debut of No. 1 overall pick Cam Newton as Carolina’s quarterback (and the way the Cards will defend him), the debut of the Cards’ own new players like quarterback Kevin Kolb, to the 10thanniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Emotion will be plentiful.

More than anything, though, the Cardinals want to begin the season the right way. They can’t accomplish everything in one afternoon – the Cards won their season opener last season, and were 3-2 at one point before things fell apart – but they wouldn’t mind some tangible proof they have changed what ailed them.

“It was mentioned in training camp, because we wanted people to know what we went through last year,” running back Beanie Wells said. “We wanted to let (the new players) know we never want to go through it again. After a preseason game, it got erased. This is a new moment. We can’t take the past with us to the future.”

Dockett clings to the motivation. Others want to move past it. Coach Ken Whisenhunt said whatever works a player is fine with him.

“Last year was last year,” safety Adrian Wilson said. “Different circumstances, different team, everything is different. Different attitude. Last year we didn’t have a margin for error and that weighed heavily on a lot of defenders.”

via Starting Anew.

Sep 09

Time Lapse Video of Frank Kush Field Being Painted – Arizona State University Official Athletic Site

While you wait for the game, take a second to watch a pretty awesome time lapse of

Frank Kush Field being painted by our friends in the Media Relations office.

Time Lapse Video of Frank Kush Field Being Painted – Arizona State University Official Athletic Site.

Sep 08

Video Contest for Free tickets to the Cardinals and Panthers on Sun. 9-11-11

VIDEO CONTEST!

 

Go here to check out the rules! https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=129949710437331

Sep 07

“We’re Going To Pressure”

“We’re Going To Pressure”

By Darren Urban

Unveiling of Horton’s defense comes against rookie Newton

The Cards plan on pressuring Panthers quarterback Cam Newton much like Giants linebacker (and ex-Cardinal) Alex Hall did in the preseason.

“Luck of the draw,” safety Kerry Rhodes said with a smile, after considering the Cardinals, for a second straight season, will open against a quarterback who was just the No. 1 overall pick in the draft.

There are many differences in the approach against the Rams’ Sam Bradford last year and the Panthers’ Cam Newton this year – not the least of which is the Cards’ own change in defensive coordinators. Newton may be a 6-foot-5, 250-pound physical specimen, and a raw passer. None of that particularly matters.

“We’re going to pressure, that’s what we do, and I don’t care if they know it,” Horton said Wednesday. “We’re coming after him.

“Young, old, the kid out in Green Bay (Aaron Rodgers), the guy in New England (Tom Brady) is a good quarterback, but we’re going to come after people. We make no bones about it.”

via “We’re Going To Pressure”.

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